Gilbert & George

British artists
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Gilbert & George, British collaborative team made up of Gilbert Proesch (b. September 17, 1943, Dolomites, Italy) and George Passmore (b. January 8, 1942, Plymouth, Devon, England), whose dynamic and often humorous insertion of themselves into their art proved an important chapter in postwar British conceptual art.

After some earlier training (Gilbert at the Munich Academy, George at the Art School in Oxford), the two artists met in 1967 as students at St. Martin’s School of Art in London. In a challenge to the methods taught at St. Martin’s, they began to blur the distinction between their “real” life and their artistic life. By 1969 they were presenting themselves as living sculptures. In a series of live performances, such as The Singing Sculpture (1969), Gilbert & George appeared dressed in business suits with their faces covered in bronze powder, and, using staccato and puppetlike gestures, they sang and moved to the accompaniment of a recording of the Depression-era song “Underneath the Arches.” They also began producing a number of videos, such as A Portrait of the Artists as Young Men (1970) and Gordon’s Makes Us Drunk (1972), in which they drank gin, smoked cigarettes, repeated particular phrases, moved about slowly, and so on. With these irreverent and insouciant activities as well as their later artistic endeavours, Gilbert & George sought to question—among other things—the fetishization of the art object. They claimed their entire lives as art.

After creating a series of large charcoal drawings (c. 1970–75), Gilbert & George began to focus their efforts on making large multi-paneled photographic works that took on an increasingly social and political tone. Each of these works contains images of the artists, almost always dressed in their signature business attire, combined with many other images. Gilbert & George also dyed some of their black-and-white photographs with bold colours, creating an overall effect somewhat like modern stained glass in several of their pictorial assemblages. In Attacked (1991) the artists seem both stoic and vulnerable: they are depicted standing at attention in bright red suits, assaulted by flying symbols. Their later work was often controversial in subject matter, sometimes offensive and at other times, according to some critics, verging on pornographic. Into the 21st century they continued to provoke both laughter and outrage. Indeed, during the COVID-19 pandemic, while many were posting signs with words of solidarity and hope in their windows, the duo offered downloadable posters with the wry slogan “Gilbert & George say: Don’t catch it!” (2020).

Gilbert & George’s work was exhibited internationally, in such institutions as the Pompidou Centre (1982), Paris; the Guggenheim Museum (1985), New York City; the Stedelijk Museum (1996), Amsterdam; and the Serpentine Gallery (2002), London. A retrospective of their work (“Major Exhibition,” 2007–09) originated at the Tate Modern, London, and then traveled to Haus der Kunst, Munich; the de Young Museum, San Francisco; and the Brooklyn Museum, New York City.

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